The Top 10 Safety Signs

top 10 safety signsThe Top 10 safety Signs

Every non domestic premise in the UK is governed by safety legislation and as such will have a need for safety signs. Safety signage is a cost effective and efficient way to warn and educate people to the particular risks associated with a building. While there are some signs, such as fire signs, which will be common to all buildings, there are many others which will only be relevant in certain situations. The way to determine the signs needed should be by way of a full risk assessment and perhaps a sign site survey.

Below we have put together our top 10 list of the typical signs likely to be found in businesses and public buildings, but please bear in mind that every building has different requirements and signage should be judged on individual risk assessments.


health and safety law poster


1. UK Health and Safety Law Poster.

There is a legal requirement to display this poster or distribute equivalent leaflet.

 

 

 

fire action notice2. Fire Action Notices

These are needed to show actions necessary in an emergency such as sounding a fire alarm,

 

 

 

 

 

fire exit sign3. Fire Exit and Emergency Escape signs

These are used to indicate emergency routes and emergency escapes. Used to mark safe means of escape.

ire equipment signs4. Fire Equipment Signs

These are used to mark the location of fire fighting and fire safety equipment.

 

 

 

 

first aid signs5. First Aid Signs

Signs showing the location of first aid facilities. No longer a legal requirement but the Electric Shock Emergency Action sign is also recommended.

 

 

 

 

no smoking signs5. No Smoking

July 2007 saw a total smoking ban in all enclosed public places, work places and certain vehicles in the UK. The smoke free legislation means it is an offence not to display the appropriate No Smoking Signs, resulting in fines up to £1000.

 

 

 

slipper floor signs7. Wet Floors

These need to be used wherever a slippery area is not cordoned off. Most premises will have routine cleaning operations which may leave areas vulnerable. Lightweight stands holding double-sided signs are readily available.

 

 

 

 

mind the step signs 8. Obstacles or Dangerous Locations.

Most buildings however well designed will have localized hazards, the most common of which are trip hazards and low hanging obstacles. So in joint 8th place we have the trip hazard, mind the step and mind your head signs.

caustic, hazardous chemical signs9. Chemical Storage.

Where hazardous cleaning chemicals are stored, apart from keeping the store locked, a suitable warning notice should be posted if it is considered this would help to reduce injury.

first aid for burns posters10. Kitchens/Catering

Most premises have kitchen or catering facilities. Scalds and burns are common, a poster showing recommended action is advisable.

Safety Sign Audit – A safe way to start the year and burn some Christmas Calories too

Well the New Year is here, and it’s time to burn off that extra mince pie, so what better way to do that than by giving your premises a safety once over this week. So here is a timely reminder of why you should give your facilities a safety sign MOT.

Time for a safety signs MOT?

safety sign auditAs the New Year comes upon us our thoughts often turn to personal improvements we intend to make over the coming year, but one much over looked resolution is the implementation of a regular safety sign audit.

Julian Rowlandson, Director at Stocksigns explains: “If you own a car it is most probable that you obtain and MOT and carry out a routine service to keep your vehicle fully functional and compliant. But few companies, despite their legal obligations to do so, regularly revisit their fire and other mandatory signage. How often does one hear of tragedy caused by fire exit routes not being clear and available for use? Often these oversights maybe associated with changes within business operations and a failure to update signs and safe routes of escape to embrace these operational changes.”

Failing to update your signage as your business changes, could lead to extensive fines or have more serious consequences including prison sentences, personal injuries or even loss of life. These simple inexpensive precautions could help protect your business, staff and visitors.

Read the original article in full to learn how to walk your premises and carry our a safety sign audit (you may even burn some calories too)

Fire Exit Signs Meanings Tutorial

fire exit signsTo follow on from our recent posts about fire exit signs we have put together this short tutorial on fire exit signs their meanings and where to position them. For larger projects or new builds you may wish to organise a site survey. If you would like further advice please call our Sales Team on 01737 77 40 72.

See our recent article about Fire exit signs and positioning.

Don’t get caught out with the #1 mistake made with the Positioning of Fire Exit Signs

wrong and right positioning for fire exits signs

One of the most common mistakes we see with the positioning of fire exit signs is the sign above a doorway. The sign that should be used in most instances should be the arrow up, indicating progress forward from here (indicating direction of travel), and in the case of above a door means, progress forward and through from here.

However we commonly see the incorrect fire exit sign with down arrow. While this wrong sign is unlikely to cause too much confusion as to which way someone should go it is technically incorrect. The down arrow fire exit sign means progress down from here, and technically would only be positioned above a door if there was a change of level downwards immediately after the door way.

We do however appreciate that it can be quite confusing, find out more about where to position your fire exit signs here or call us for more advice on 01737 77 40 72

Where to Position Fire Exit Signs

Fire Exit Signs form one of the most important parts of your emergency escape plan, they are used to correctly mark the most efficient escape routes. Careful positioning of the relevant fire exit signs, will assist evacuation in times of emergency. Every building will have it’s own unique layout and seeking advice from experts is always advantages when planning your escape routes. However there are certain common building layouts, that occur time and again and knowing which fire exit signs to place where can save lives.

In this post we cover some of the most common examples

Fire Exit Signs On Stairs

Fire exit signs

Sign 1. means progress down to the right as viewed from in front of the sign. Sign sited on wall of half landing.

Sign 2. This means progress down from here as viewed from in front of the sign. Sign can be suspended from the ceiling or could be mounted on the wall above the stair head.

 

 

Fire Exit Signs in Corridors and Building final Exits

fire exit signs

Sign 1. Progress forward and through from here as viewed from in front of the sign positioned above door.

Signs 2a and 2b. Progress to the left/right from here. Suspended at change of direction.

Sign 3. Progress forward and through from here as viewed from in front of the sign. Positioned above the door. Note: Outside the final exit (labelled 3) if the door can be obstructed a ‘Fire Exit Keep Clear‘ sign is needed on the outside of the door. This could be enhanced with the use of bollards or yellow hatching. If the door is the last door before exiting the building you may have a sign that reads ‘fire exit’ without the need for an arrow.

Fire Exit Signs Above doors

fire exit signs

Sign 1. Progress forward and through from here as viewed from in front of the sign. Positioned above the door.

A common mistake here is to have a fire exit sign with the arrow pointing down, which means progress down from here, and technically would only be positioned above a door if there was a change of level downwards immediately after the door way.

Sign 2. Means progress down to the left from here as viewed from in front of the sign. Positioned on the landing.

If you are still unsure of of where to position your fire exit signs please give us a call on 01737 77 40 72 to speak to one of our advisors or to arrange a site survey.

Fire Action Notices Conveying Evacuation Procedures Effectively

fire action noticesFire action notices can contain several texts which are in common use but may not be appropriate for all circumstances but there are certain messages that should be included. There are four significant areas that need to be addressed.

1.       Raising the Alarm.

This should advise of the most appropriate method of action whether this be by operating the nearest fire alarm call point, calling 999, verbally or by any other alarm procedure used in there evacuation procedure.

2.      Fire Brigade.

The fire brigade is often called automatically through the alarm system, however it may be necessary to call the fire brigade manually. Your Fire Action notice may also give additional information which you would be required to pass on to the operator, such as telephone number and exact location details.

3.       Assembly Point

A blank space is provided for details of the nearest assembly point. An assembly point is usually a static safe area marked with the appropriate signage. For premises that have no clear area to use as a regular assembly point mobile extendable fire assembly point signs can be used to guide occupants to the designated safe area.

4.       Additional Instruction

It is customary to include further instructions such as “do not stop to collect personal belongings” or “ do not return to the building for any reason until authorised to do so”.

More specific information can be included for example there can be precise instructions in buildings which have lifts, or for houses that have multiple occupancy.

 Where should you display your fire action notices?

Best practice suggests fire action notices should be displayed next to every fire alarm call point and next to the final fire exits. This gives the relevant information at a glance to the person raising the alarm and any further action that maybe required.

There are two distinct styles of fire action notice, one the traditional blue and red sign with written instructions and the other incorporating graphic symbols in line with BS EN ISO 7010. Both of which meet current legislation however the graphic symbol version is growing in popularity due to the effectiveness of relaying information quickly through symbols which would be critical in an evacuation situation.

fire action notices

pictorial Fire Action Notices

Summer Safety Signage Audit

Summer Safety Signage Audit

The summer months and the holiday season are the ideal time to carry out a signage audit. Your business premises may be quieter, as staff jet off on their well earned breaks, often leaving car parks and buildings temporarily easier to access. Use this time and the increased access to assess your company signage, making sure signs are present, in good condition and correct to the latest legislation.

Also the summer can be a time when there maybe a need to increase security to your grounds or buildings. Building sites and disused quarries can seem attractive places to play, potentially with tragic consequences, so ensuring your boundary safety signs are all in place becomes critical.

Taking Stock of your Safety Signs

Take time to walk around your premises, it may take a couple of trips round if you have a large or complicated building layout.
Note all your existing fire and safety signs. Do you have all the necessary signs covered byincorrect safety signs - no fire alarm
legislation? Through the course of the year things happen to your building, were signs
replaced after that wall got repainted? Were your signs covered up when you had the last office move round? This photograph illustrates a common example. The fire alarm call points in this hotel were relocated during a refit. Unfortunately the sign has not been updated and the fire action notice now marks just a redundant blanking plate. On the flip side, you guessed it, the alarm call points were relocated but they missing safety signs - fire alarmhave failed to install the correct fire equipment signage to mark its new location. Many people find that their fire signage is often in the wrong place, check your emergency escape signage is being displayed properly. If you are not sure whether you are completely covered legally get a site survey done to give you peace of mind.
While it isn’t yet a requirement to change all your existing safety signs to the new ISO 7010 versions, the advice is not to mix signage from different legislative standards. Best practice recommends, if changes or additions are needed, updating to the most recent standard.This photo shows a BS 5499 fire exit sign directly mounted next to a sign with symbols from the EEC directive 92/58, which could lead to confusion.mixing safety signs

Care of your safety Signs

Safety signs over time can become dirty or damaged and several environmental factors can effect your signs. Signs in areas of high traffic can become dirty quickly. Make sure all signs are clean and clear and can be easily read, and cleaned where needed. If they are illegible and beyond cleaning replace where necessary.
For more information about safety signs or any other signage query please contact our sales team at sales@stocksigns.co.uk

Everything you always wanted to know about COSHH (but were too afraid to ask!) – by RoSPA

Spill kit2 COSHH

A Guide to COSHH – A Guest post from RoSPA

If you’ve ever had any dealings with any aspect of Health and Safety, the chances are you’ve come across the acronym COSHH or one of the COSHH symbols. However, you may still be uncertain about what COSHH actually stands or what the symbols mean. Don’t worry though, help is at hand with our informative short guide to COSHH.

 What does COSSH stand for?

COSHH stands for ‘Control of Substances Hazardous to Health’ and under the Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regulations 2002, employers need to either prevent or reduce their workers’ exposure to substances that are hazardous to their health.

 What are ‘substances hazardous to health?’

 Broadly speaking, substances hazardous to health include any substances that could cause harm to employees, contractors and other people. These hazardous substances can come in many different forms, including:

  • Chemicals
  • Fumes
  • Dusts
  • Vapours
  • Mists
  • Nanotechnology
  • Gases
  • Asphyxiating gases
  • Biological agents

 

 What do the COSHH symbols stand for?

The COSHH symbols are a set of international symbols that allow you to understand the different hazards within your organisation. They have been in use since 1967, with each symbol representing a different type of hazard. In 2009 the symbols were updated to reflect the international nature of hazardous substances. See the chart below for a guide to the new international hazard symbols:

COSHH symbols

COSHH Training

COSHH training is designed to safeguard your employees, teaching them to to identify, measure and control the exposure to harmful substances. A COSHH training course should provide you with:

 

  • An understanding of how and which substances can harm health
  • Knowledge and definitions of exposure limits
  • Skills to understand exposure and to conduct risk assessments
  • A greater understanding of practical control measures and safe systems of work

 Where can I find out more?

The HSE has a free downloadable guide called ‘Working with substances hazardous to health’ – which is a brief overview of COSHH.

The RoSPA Workplace Safety Blog also contains further information on COSHH, as well as other useful posts on all matters relating to occupational health and safety.

 warning signs and guide

See our offer on this COSHH information pack

Road Signs do they confuse you? survey by confused.com

Road signs? Confused? – You are not alone confirms Confused.comroad signs confused.com research‘s latest research.

Insurance website confused.com have recently published the results of a road signs survey to test the nation’s understanding of signs.

The research should some startling results;

An astonishing 93 per cent failed to recognise the traffic signs for “no vehicles except bikes being pushed”.

Meanwhile 83 per cent were unclear on the meaning of the common “Urban Clearway” sign, and 67 per cent were bamboozled by the “no waiting”  sign.

Top five confusing road signs

 

Confused.com polled 2,000 people on which road signs they found the most confusing and the following five were voted the most perplexing.

Read more: http://www.confused.com/car-insurance/articles/brits-bamboozled-confused-by-road-signs#ixzz2MCVXuguD

Photoluminescent Signs the “Eco” Benefits

photoluminescent signsHow can  signs help boost your “Green” credentials?

As part of the Stocksigns’ support of “Go Green Week”  we are looking at various ways you can use signage to boost your company’s “Green Credentials”. In this post we are revisiting the additional environmental benefits of using photoluminescent signs.

Many companies are committed to recycling and purchasing non-toxic supplies, but they still work in buildings whose materials, electrical systems and waste systems were in place long before being “eco” became the business buzz word of the moment and before the economic benefits of being green were truly understood. Different companies will have different factors to consider when improving their green credentials. For example, a solicitors firm will have different concerns than a construction site. But one way Continue reading

Winter Safety Products, Be Safe in the Big Freeze

icy car park, ice hazardProtect Your Premises With Winter Safety Products.

With the wintry weather set to continue for a few weeks yet, it’s time to take extra safety precautions. The councils do their best to grit and salt our roads, to protect road users as best they can. But what happens at the travellers’ destinations? Many road users are on their way to work and schools, where they encounter private roads, driveways and car parks, all outside the councils jurisdiction. It is here in these close to home places where most accidents occur and quite often these are the same places that do not get the safety treatment they deserve.

Don’t let your premises, car park or pathways add to this winter’s accident statistics.salt grt bin Clear car parks and pathways of ice and snow, and regularly grit with salt to stop them re-freezing. When clearing snow ensure you have the right tools. A Snow pusher is lightweight and has a bi-directional blade making clearing of large areas quick and efficient. Products such as Ice Melt will clear icy patches quickly, with no damagede-icing salt to carpets, floors or plants.

Once staff and visitors are inside your premises the hazard doesn’t stop, floors in receptions, entry points and non carpeted corridors become slippery even with relatively low footfall levels. Make sure these trouble spots are regularly mopped, adequate door matting is available and suitable slip hazard signage used.

Winter Hazard Zones Check List

  • Grit all car parks.
  • Ensure all external paths are cleared and regularly gritted.
  • Areas with high footfall such as entrances and smoking shelters, need extra attention.
  • Hall ways, entrance lobbies and receptions will become wet and slippery, ensure areas are mopped regularly and adequate warning signs used.
  • Check stocks of salt and grit.
  • Install speed limit signage in large car parks and driveways.

Safety Signs and General Signage Guide

safety signs Stocksigns 2013 Safety Signs Catalogue and Signage Guide

We are delighted to to announce that our new 2013 safety signs and general signage catalogue is out now. We offer you the most comprehensive range of safety signs in the UK, complying with the latest applicable legislation.

Great value and quality with rapid supply and if you don’t see what you need we can design a sign to your own requirements.

Our catalogue is packed with advice and information to help you meet your legal and safety obligations. With over 50 years of experience in the safety arena you can be sure you are talking to knowledgeable professionals who are always ready to help. sales@stocksigns.co.uk

Safety Signs Resources with New Pinterest Page

Safety Signs Pinterest Page for Signage Resources

Stocksigns has created a Pinterest page to help bring together some of the links to the industries bestpinterest safety signs resources safety signs and general signage resources.

As we both publish our own signage information, and find the latest innovations and technologies within the industry, we will aggregate them together in our new page. Be sure to visit regularly or add it to your favourites to keep all your signage resources in one place. Also please send any signage information and resources that you would lik to be added to the page. You can contact me directly on jgodden@stocksigns.co.uk

National Braille Week

braille fire exit signsBraille Week runs from the 7th – 13th October

Over the centuries Braille has had an enormous effect on the lives of millions of people across 120 countries worldwide. It is not a language but a code by which all languages may be written and read. The ability to read and write in Braille opens the door to literacy, intellectual freedom, equal opportunity, and personal security. It is an extremely important gateway to opportunity for the UK’s blind or partially sighted people, enabling them to be more independent.

Tactual from Stocksigns

The Stocksigns Braille signs range – Tactual – fully comply with Technical Bulletin 24 of the joint Mobility Unit. The JMU is a service provided by the RNIB and the Guide Dogs for the Blind Association. Tactual signs may be manufactured to suit individual needs including a range of text options, panel colours and layouts. We can advise you on your own legal obligations and ensure that your workplace is complying with the appropriate regulations. Braille can be incorporated into your corporate signage to extend the audience range and the reach of your signs.accessibility 21 Braille Signs – Tactual from Stocksigns It can be included in information and tourist interpretation boards to extend their accessibility and contact points, such as emergency assistance points, with Braille offer help to vulnerable members of the public.

Stocksigns only supply Braille signs that we manufacture ourselves. As a result not only can we be sure that they are of the highest quality but also that we have the technology and expertise to manufacture any custom made sign with Braille to our own specification. We manufacture both Braille Safety signs and Braille Information signs in standard designs, as well as being able to add Braille to custom-made signs.

Read more about our Tactual signs

Safety Signs Check-up

Safety Signs Check-Up For The New Year

While safety signs may not have been at the top of your Christmas list, this time of year is the perfect time to carry out a signage audit of your premises. The beginning of year is always associated with fresh starts, out with the old and in with the new. We often get renewed energy which gives us the impetus to start new projects or clear the decks in anticipation of what January will bring.

Taking Stock of your Safety Signs

Take time to walk round your premises, it may take a couple of trips round if you have aemergency exit signs large or complicated building layout. Note all your existing fire and safety signs. Do you have all the necessary signs covered by legislation? Through the course of the year things happen to your building, were signs replaced after that wall got repainted? were your signs covered up when you had the last office move round? Many people find that their fire signage is often in the wrong place, check your emergency escape signage is being displayed properly. If you are not sure whether you are completely covered legally get a site survey done to give you peace of mind. While it isn’t yet a requirement to change all your existing safety signs to the new ISO7010 versions make sure any missing or damaged signs are replaced with the new updated symbols.

Care of your safety Signs

Safety signs over time can become dirty or damaged several environmental factors can effect your signs. Signs in areas of high traffic can become dirty quickly. Make sure all signs are clean and clear and be easily read, cleaning where needed. If they are illegible and beyond cleaning replace where necessary.

multi message construction safety signsSignage Clutter

Have you got too many safety signs? are the messages you are giving out confusing? If it is a high hazard area consider replacing a number of your signs with single multi message signs. Having your safety information in one place will not only look smarter but will help reduce sign blindness- where people are so used to seeing the same signs day in day out they in fact cease to register seeing the signs at all.

For more information about safety signs or any other signage query please contact our sales team sales@stocksigns.co.uk  and don’t forget to order your new 2013 catalogue.

This article was first published in December 2011.

What size sign should I use? A viewing distance guide

What size signs should I use? – Viewing Distances For Signs

We are often asked by customers what size sign they should be using, particularly with regard to safety signs. The truth is there is no hard and fast rule for size of sign and viewing distances. Currently there is no legislation covering this aspect of safety signs and symbols, and common sense has to be used to make a judgement. The viewing distance for signs is dependant on many factors.

  • Ambient Light Conditions
  • Obstructions
  • Height of the sign
  • The colours of the sign design
  • The style and size of the fonts used

However to help in choosing the right signs and make more of an informed decision, the following illustrations will serve as a guide. If you would still like some assistance call our sales team on 01737 77 40 72, or alternatively a site survey  of your premises by one of our team, can give you peace of mind, ensuring you have the right signs for your building.

what size signs - viewing distances for fire signs

Cycle Safety Signs – Vehicle Mounted Signs

Cycle safety signs warning Cyclistscycle safety signs about the dangers of passing a vehicle on the left-hand side – DO NOT PASS ON THIS SIDE SIGNS

Cycle safety signs from Stocksigns. Every year 15,000 cyclists are killed or injured on our roads. The most common accident is the motorist turning into the path of cyclists. This is an issue that has been taken very seriously by freight operating companies and safety campaigners alike. Working with some major aggregate companies, Stocksigns has developed vehicle mounted warning cycle safety signs directed at cyclists and warning them of the danger of undertaking lorries, particularly at traffic lights.

Cycle Safety Signs

 

cycle safety signcycle safety signs 02941

Stocksigns has a huge range of safety signs for cyclists and are working closely with FORS to help improve safety on the roads in the Capital. RoSPA have produced this short educational film highlighting the dangers faced by pedal cyclists, especially in relation to lorries on the road.

LED Display Technology from Messagemaker

 

led displayVeolia opts for LED Display Technology from Messagemaker (Sister company to Stocksigns) 

Six-times winner of the prestigious Gold award for Occupational Health and Safety from RoSPA, the Pitsea site took the decision to install the new LED signs as a means of delivering heightened safety awareness through a permanent visual reminder that is regularly refreshed to capture and retain people’s attention.

The Pitsea landfill site has been operating for the last 100 years, during which time the local population has greatly expanded.  Currently, the Pitsea site now handles anywhere up to 800,000 tonnes of waste per annum and employs around 50 staff, who are engaged in a number of operations, from composting and landfill gas treatment to energy generation.

Pole mounted with acrylic vinyl lettering and branded with the company’s logo, the 1200 mm square signs offer a positive first impression with clear visibility across the site.  A series of bright red LED displays, readable from distances of up to 40 metres, convey key information to site personnel.

In addition to displaying the current date and time, a four-digit data window displays up to date information on the site’s safety record, expressed as elapsed time since the last logged incident (LTA). A scrolling text window running along the whole width of the sign allows key safety messages to be displayed.  Used to draw the attention of site workers and visitors to different types of risk – from the presence of reversing vehicles to a reminder to wear hard hats – these displays can be updated remotely at any time from the main site office via a remote wireless link, using the software provided with the system.

Following the success of the LED signs at Pitsea, the company is now considering rolling out the technology to other sites across the UK.

Shaun Taylor, landfill and recycling manager at Pitsea for Veolia Environmental Services said: “Both as a company and here on site we take safety seriously and we are proud of our award-winning track record.  The brightness and readability of the new LED signs attracts attention, even at a distance.  The constantly changing messaging keeps people’s attention as well as enabling us to draw their attention to a whole range of safety issues, all equally important in protecting staff and visitors.”

School Signs Catalogue – Latest Edition

school signsSchool Signs Catalogue Latest Edition – fully updated and available on-line now.

Stocksigns is delighted to publish their new edition of the School Signs Catalogue. Available on-line, it boasts the most comprehensive range of safety signs for schools, along with “easy order” sign guides for the most commonly required custom-made signs for schools.

An ideal school reference guide for Head Teachers, Bursars, Local Authorities and Contractors. For more information or advice on our School signs ranges, view our catalogue on-line or call our Sales Team on 01737 77 40 72.

How to Apply Vinyl Graphics

 

This article is dedicated to the different application methods used for applying/installing self adhesive vinyl signs and window graphics. Many of our safety sign ranges come with a self adhesive vinyl option making

frosted vinyl screen, glass highlighting

them very versatile and easy to install. We also offer a range of frosted vinyl window graphics in both standard and custom-made designs. Glass Highlighting can also help you comply with Regulation 14 of the Workplace (Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1992. The Regulation requires the marking of windows and glass doors to make them conspicuous.

  

  

  How to apply your vinyl signs and graphics

How to apply vinyl graphics

Before applying any self adhesive graphics make sure that the application surface is clean and free from contaminants. To apply your self adhesive graphics, use one of the following methods:

For Small Sizes (up to approximately 20 x 20cm)

1. You will need a squeegee.  ( a small rigid plastic card designed for sign applicating, if you can’t get one, a small professional window cleaning one will do, or even an old credit card)

2. Remove the backing paper from the face material.

3. Position the sticker/sign on the surface and press in place with finger tips.

4. Apply the sticker to the surface with squeegee, using overlapping strokes. Puncture any air bubbles with a needle and press in place.

mobile phones, prohibition, safety signs

For Medium Sizes

1. You will need a squeegee (see above).

2. Remove 3-5cm of the backing paper from one edge of the sticker and fold back.

3. Position the sticker to the surface and press the exposed adhesive area in place with finger tips.

4. Apply the sticker to the surface with squeegee, using overlapping strokes, removing the backing paper little by little with the other hand puncture any air bubbles with a needle and press in place.

Wet application method for large sizes

1. You will need a squeegee (see above), sponge or cloth, water plus a little liquid detergent (i.e. washing up liquid), agitated to produce foam bubbles.

2. Temperature of the application surface and in the workshop should be 15°C or above.frosted glass, room divider, glass highlighting

3. Wet the application surface entirely with foam bubbles.

4. Remove the backing paper, keeping the sticker flat.

5. Apply the sticker to the wet surface and bring into position.

6. Remove any excess foam bubbles from underneath the sticker with a squeegee, using light pressure in overlapping strokes, working from the centre. Dry the sticker with a cloth.

7. Secure the sticker to the surface with a squeegee, using overlapping strokes and firm pressure, paying particular attention to the edges, to ensure a firm bond.

8. When possible, check and re-squeegee firmly after 24 hours.

*note – With this application method ultimate adhesion of the sticker/sign is reached later than with a dry method. The sticker/sign will obtain ultimate adhesion about 24-48 hours after application.

Safety Signs Audit For The New Year

Safety Signs Audit For The New Year

While safety signs may not have been at the top of your Christmas list, this time of year is the perfect time to carry out a signage audit of your premises. The beginning of year is always associated with fresh starts, out with the old and in with the new. We often get renewed energy which gives us the impetus to start new projects or clear the decks in anticipation of what January will bring.

Taking Stock of your Safety Signs

Take time to walk round your premises, it may take a couple of trips round if you have aemergency exit signs large or complicated building layout. Note all your existing fire and safety signs. Do you have all the necessary signs covered by legislation? Through the course of the year things happen to your building, were signs replaced after that wall got repainted? were your signs covered up when you had the last office move round? Many people find that their fire signage is often in the wrong place, check your emergency escape signage is being displayed properly.If you are not sure whether you are completely covered legally get a site survey done to give you peace of mind. While it isn’t yet a requirement to change all your existing safety signs to the new ISO7010 versions make sure any missing or damaged signs are replaced with the new updated symbols.

Care of your safety Signs

Safety signs over time can become dirty or damaged several environmental factors can effect your signs. Signs in areas of high traffic can become dirty quickly. Make sure all signs are clean and clear and be easily read, cleaning where needed. If they are illegible and beyond cleaning replace where necessary.

multi message construction safety signsSignage Clutter

Have you got too many safety signs? are the messages you are giving out confusing? If it is a high hazard area consider replacing a number of your signs with single multi message signs. Having your safety information in one place will not only look smarter but will help reduce sign blindness- where people are so used to seeing the same signs day in day out they in fact cease to register seeing the signs at all.

For more information about safety signs or any other signage query please contact our sales team sales@stocksigns.co.uk .

Safety Signs – RoSPA’s Business case for Safety

 Roger Bibbings, RoSPA’s Occupational Safety Adviser talks about how, during these times of austerity, now is not the time to cut back, but instead invest in health and safety. Safety Signs can be a key part of this.

Safety Signs

Safety signs are a cost effective way of enhance your safety policy. They can be used to warn of inherent dangers, they can be used to promote safety awareness and used as training aids in safety training. A site survey from Stocksigns can help ensure your premises meet current legislation and best practice.

Where to use Emergency Exit Signs

fire exit signsWhich Emergency Exit Sign to use where?

We are often asked by our customers which fire exit sign they should use where and with which arrow? This simple guide will help you to select the right signs for your premises and keeping within current legislation. The directional arrows are designed to give visual instructions of the safest route to take in the event of an emergency.

A site survey of your premises can help you ensure your emergency escape plans have the correct signage and can form part of your safety risk assessment.

Below shows the directional arrows and their meanings on Emergency Exit Signs

 fire exit signs Progress down from here    
 fire exit signs Progress forward from here or progress forward and through here. The most commonly used emergency escape sign often seen above doorways.    
 fire exit signs Progress to the right from here    
 fire exit signs Progress to the left from here    
 fire exits Progress down and right from here    
 fire exit signs Progress down and left from here    
 fire exit signs Progress up and right from here    
 fire exit signs Progress up and left from here    

Blogs That Follow

Traffic Signs – Protecting Children

Road Traffic Warning Signs around Children’s Play Areas

Stocksigns has long been famous for manufacturing good quality traffic signs, and boasts an extensive range. The importance of traffic warning signs is evident from their common place use but here is what RoSPA (Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents) says about Traffic Signs and their use for protecting children.

RoSPA’s Traffic Signs Guide

Traffic signs are a common site through out our road network or where children have to cross, or walk adjacent to a road, to access a play area some form of traffic control is advisable. Whilst most measures are beyond the resources of the smaller authorities, the provision of standard warning signs advising motorists that they are approaching an area where children play is economic and is advised. There are standard signs available and in most cases the relevant highways authority will provide such signage.

Signs should be clearly visible from all approach directions and should be positioned sufficiently far away from te area to enable motorists, if necessary, to adjust their speed to an acceptable level. The signs should be placed so as not to be obscured by planting growth.

Warning signs not only (hopefully) reduce motorist’s speed but also raise their awareness of the presence of children.

As well as providing traffic signs care should be taken to ensure that planting, other road signs, or other roadside materials do not obscure sight lines for both motorists and pedestrian. This may mean keeping hedges and verges well cut back.

Stocksigns and RoSPA

Stocksigns is RoSPA (Royal Socisty of the Prevention of Accidents) official safety signs partner. Read more about our safety signs partnership

A Surplus of Signs or a Safety Necessity? Safety Signs Clutter Debate

Safety signs clutter?

There has been much talk recently about signs pollution, the proliferation of signs all over our town and countryside, from high street to motorway, from factory to farm. Which not only can blight our landscape or built environment, but also cause confusion by virtue of the sign’s own cluttering promiscuity.

Does this apply to health and safety signs?

Not so, in our view. First, the very purpose of properly located and appropriate safety signage is to protect staff and visitors on your premises, when all other means to mitigate a risk has been considered an actioned.  In this case “familiarity does NOT breed contempt – rather the continual and consistent viability of such safety aids increases awareness and comprehension of the potential dangers and the means of avoiding or evading them. This is not just a negative “do not” approach as is evident from essential use of fire and emergency exit signs in their various forms.

Secondly, the key to effective health and safety signage starts with the comprehensive assessment of the risks in a workplace and, where these can not be avoided, the selection ofmulti message construction safety signs the most appropriate signs – which in many cases, separate safety messages can be incorporated in one multi-purpose sign, so quite legitimately saving space and money.

Safety Signs Training

A further crucial ingredient is the general level of safety awareness that is developed within your organisation, and in particular, the education and training of staff with respect to safety signs. Here, there are a number of  aides, such as pocket guides (for example, these can be included in an induction pack) and the Health and Safety Law Poster safety pocket guidesthat are in any event a legal requirement to display.

In all these areas Stocksigns can help, although ultimately, of course the responsibility lies with you. Our advice, a combination of physical surveys and the wide range of signs on offer, will eliminate the over-use of signs, but protect the organisation, and its employees and visitors, which after all, is the whole point.

How safe is your school? – School Safety Signs

School Safety Signs

No-one wants to go overboard about safety in schools, any more than they do
school safety signsabout every day living elsewhere. And, of course, schools take the matter of safety for everybody involved – not only pupils, but also staff and visitors, who are equally important – very seriously.

However, it is worth reviewing not just the provision of, say, signage, but also how well it is understood. Stocksigns has a long tradition of innovation in school signage, (for example created new designs for laboratory safety signs some 15 years ago) and our latest schools catalogue has been developed to be particularly user-friendly throughout the school environment.

school signs

One such way is the use of friendly fonts and graphics which more easily grabs the attention of the pupils so that they more closely identify with the message. This helps comprehension.

Sign design for a large number of safety signs is more formally required by legislation and/or relevant British Standards. This is necessary to ensure consistancy across all possible premises in which they might be used, for example Fire Exit Signs and Emergency Escape Signs.

Outside these sensible constraints, however, some imagination can be brought to bear, which reflects on a school’s individual ethos and style. So, a sign can be chosen from the Stocksigns catalogue or designed by the school, whether or not using our graphics expertise and experience, to produce something unique for your school.

Then not only will you have the assurance that you comply with the statutory requirements, you can have a signage system which is a little bit special to yourschool signs catalogue school. You can enlist the creative spirit of the pupils (or even staff) which will give an even greater sense of achievement. For ideas, why not let us send you, if you don’t have one already a copy of our “Signs for Schools Catalogue

Fire Exit Signs and Emergency Escape Signs

 

ceiling mounted fire escape signsJust because there is statutory requirement for all non-domestic premises to have the right fire safety signage, there is no reason that fire exit signs cannot be used imaginatively to fit in with your building design and decoration.

Here are some examples of the different ways that a compliant fire sign can be used.

 1. Wall and ceiling mounted signs are very useful when for example, space is at a premium or there is a low ceiling.

 2. Sign frames can add impact to the sign message. One option is to fit the sign into the appropriate sign frame, which can be suspended or wall mounted.  Alternatively, for a more design conscious solution a Vision MX frame system, which can of course be double sided.

3. Wall mounted projecting signs increase visibility from several directions.
        
4. Sometimes conditions require the use of an extra large sign, particularly in public places. Extended view of up to 40 metres can be achieved with signs 1200 x 400mm in size.
 

fire exit signs

5. Again, constraints of design or purpose may require the use of “portrait” style fire signs, for example multi-storey car parks.
 
6. An innovative aid is the use of fire exit floor graphics as part of a wider safety sign installation.
 
7. Two larger luminaires are available, for when this type of signage is required or chosen. The cylinder range comes in various options for mounting and is an elegant solution. At a very practical level are the BSI certified metal exit signs which are extremely good value for money.
          
8. Photoluminescent signs  are both effective and alternative choices, and can be used with several of the options available to the standard fire signs.
 
emergency escape signs
 
9. Signs for the physically impaired are part of the provision that can be required under the Disability Discrimination Act.  They also show an employers awareness and sensitivity to the needs of this often overlooked section of the community.
 
10. “Tactual” signs are particularly relevant to the visually impaired, with the wide spaced raised text incorporating Braille. Braille signs  fully conforming to BS5499-2:2002 and ISO 7010, as well as Technical Bulletin 24 of the joint Mobility Unit, part of the RNIB.
 
11. The Hospital Sector has developed a range of fire escape signs, specifically for the sector but have proved popular in other fields too.
   

12. Finally there is a range of “Standard Enhanced” signs with clear acrylic and satin chrome panel supports – a very aesthetically pleasing choice, which complements the design aware decor of an office, shop etc. All in all, a much larger selection of fire and emergency escape signs than perhaps one might have imagined. The good news is that Stocksigns can supply all the ranges listed above. Why not think seriously about how you enhance your signage.

fire exit signs 3

Signs for the DDA – Making Provision for the Disabled

braille signsMaking Provision for the Disabled – Its not just about the law or wheelchairs.

It’s been 7 years since the scope of the Disability Discrimination Act 1995 (DDA) became applicable to all service providers, whatever their size (i.e. 1st October 2004). But how many smaller organisations have actually made adjustments to their premises? Changes have to be reasonable and so proportionate, which is to some extent subjective. One key element – and a relatively low cost one  at that – is signage. Below we set out the background to the legislation (and the need) and show how reviewing one’s signs can have a big impact in fulfilling the legal, practical and moral obligations of our fellow citizens.      

Disability Discrimination Act 1995

 Known as the DDA, this legislation requires that from the 1st October 2004, all service providers will have made reasonable adjustments to the physical features of their premises to overcome any physical barriers to access.      

“why bother it doesn’t effect me…does it?”      

It does effect any business that provides a service, whether it’s free or paid for. Prior to 1st October, part 2 of the DDA only applied to companies who had more than 15 employees. However, since 1st October, ALL employers mist comply with the DDA’s provision on employment and occupation. There are approximately 8.6 million people with disabilities in the UK. Their estimated annual purchasing power is between £40 and £50 billion.      

“What are ‘reasonable’ adjustments?”– they must be specific to the building and the type of service being provided. Provisions should not just be restricted to improving wheelchair access, only 5% of those with disabilities are in wheelchairs.      

  • There are 600,000 wheelchair users
  • 2.5-3 million visually impaired
  • 1.5-6 million reading difficulties
  • 8 million deaf or hard of hearing
  • 15 million mental health difficulties
  • 1 in 3 people over 55 have Arthritis

 (source: Department for Inclusive Environments University of Reading)      

BS 8300:2001

The British Standard gives dimensions and details of the physical requirements needed in order to comply with the DDA as well as signage requirements.      

Disability Rights Commission

 The DRC not only provides help for disabled people, but also produced a Code of Practice and various guides for service providers.      

If you are a service provider or an employer, you need to:-

  •  assess the problem, or better still
  • have an access audit done
  • contact local access groups
  • produce an access plan

     
Once you know which physical features may make it difficult for disabled people to use your services then the law gives you a choice.  

  • you can alter the feature
  • you can remove the feature
  • you can find a way of avoiding it
  • you can provide the service in another way
  •   The DRC strongly recommends the ”inclusive” approach. Removal or alteration of a feature is the most likely option to ensure that disabled people receive the services in the same way as other customers  
       

    Areas to be considered when making reasonable adjustments

  • routes to and around buildings
  • designated car parking bays
  • building entrances and exits
  • directions to facilities – lifts, toilets etc.
  • information on services available to the disabled
  • clear indication of help points
  • emergency exit routes and disabled refuges
  • enhancement of general information signage
  •  

    Install Suitable Signage

    “signs should form part of an integrated communication scheme that gives clear directions, information and instructions for use of a building” – BS 8300:2001. Signage that complies with the DDA is based on the guidelines shown in the Sign Design Guide and developed by the Joint Mobility Unit.

    What to avoid

    Text in upper case

    Upper and lower case text provides a recognisable “footprint” even if the text can’t be read.

     

     

     

    Letter Heights

    Viewing Distance Type of sign “x” height in mm
    Long Distance External Fascias 200mm
    External location 90 – 120mm
    External Directions 90mm
    House numbers 90mm
    Medium Range Location & Direction 60mm
    Identification signs 40mm
    Close Range Room Identification 35mm
    Directories 15mm
    Wall mounted information 15mm

    Good Contrast

    Black and white provides the most obvious contrast but can cause halation for some people due to the extreme contrast and glare.

    So we are looking for:-

    • Clear text in upper and lower case
    • preferably white text on a darker background
    • letter heights based on BS 8300 or “Sign Design Guide”
    • good contrast between text and background
    • a white border to emphasise the sign
    • a matt finish to avoid glare

    Position of signs

    Consistency of sign height and position throughout the building is important. Signs should be placed between 1400mm and 1700mm for visually impaired persons when standing. For wheelchair users signs should be placed between 1000mm and 1100mm above floor level. Signs associated with control panels, e.g. lifts or door entry systems should be located between 900mm x 1200mm, to meet the needs of both wheelchair users and people standing.

    Designated Car parking

    • Parking bays and floor graphics – one space for each disabled employee plus 2% of available spaces.
    • parking bay signs
    • directional signage to reception or other areas
    • contrasting bands of colour on posts or columns
    • door entry signs

    Information Signage

    • The reception point should be clearly signed
    • signs indicating lifts, stairs, and other parts of the building
    • Facilities on each floor should be shown on landings and stairs
    • clear floor level signs in stair wells and by lifts
    • orientation signs in large buildings
    • directional signs, there and back
    • toilets, telephones, induction loop signs etc.

    Escape Route Signage

     

    Compliance with the DDA is not about avoiding being sued or fined but about caring for staff and improving your service for everyone.

    Braille Signs – Tactual from Stocksigns

    brailled signsBraille Signs

    At the end of March 2006 there were 364,615 people in the UK who were registered as severely sight impaired (blind) or sight impaired (partially sighted) – RNIB. The Tactual Braille signs range from Stocksigns is the innovative and visually superior tactile signage system. Braille signs are capable of conveying fast, effective information to assist the visually impaired. They should be used to clearly identify exits, restrooms, entrances and other rooms for the visually impaired and also assist in way finding and navigation through your premises. Braille or Tactual Signs provide facility information in Braille for the visually impaired and also in bold letters and graphics for those who are not.

    Braille Signs – Tactual from Stocksigns

    The Stocksigns Braille signs range – Tactual – fully comply with Technical Bulletin 24 of the joint Mobility Unit. The JMU is a service provided by the RNIB and the Guide Dogs for the Blind Association. Tactual signs may be manufactured to suit individual needs including a range of text options, panel colours and layouts. We can advise you on your own legal obligations and ensure that your workplace is complying with the appropriate regulations. Braille can be incorporated into your corporate signage to extend the audience range and the reach of your signs.braille signs Braille can be included in information and tourist interpretation boards to extend their accessibility and contact points, such as emergency assistance points, with Braille offer help to vulnerable members of the public.

    Stocksigns only supply Braille signs that we manufacture ourselves. As a result not only can we be sure that they are of the highest quality but also that we have the technology and expertise to manufacture any custom made sign with Braille to our own specification.

    What to look for in Braille Signs

    When choosing Braille signs from any supplier make sure they have the following features:

    • Wide spaced, raised text.
    • Highly durable, accurate, grade 1 Braille.
    • Braille locator.
    • Low gloss surface, high contrast colour range.
    • All safety symbols conform to BS 5499-5:2002 and ISO 7010

     custom made signs

    Stocksigns the health and safety signs and custom made signage manufacturer

    Smartsign – temperature sensitive smart signs

    smartsignsHelp protect your staff or family with the Stocksigns Smartsign™

    The award winning Smartsign is designed for use on surfaces changing from cold to hot, immediately warning people of a dangerous hazard and helping reduce accidental burn injuries.

    – Displays the word ‘HOT’ when the surface temperature reaches 50°C / 122°F

    – Designed to “BS 5499 part 1” and conforms to the “Health and Safety (Safety Signs and Signals) Regulations 1996”

    – Used in both domestic and industrial environments. Ideal for items that remain hot even after being switched off and the user might assume it has cooled down. 

    Smartsign Applications

    Appllications include water heaters, fan heaters, generators, boilers, motors and hundreds of machines/appliances. It is designed for surfaces that regulate temperatures within the smart signrange of -30°C and +90°C away from direct UV light. 

     Please click on the items below to view some pictures:

    Radiators

    Dishwashers

    Toasters

    Oven doors

    Catering trolley

    Motors 

    Smartsign Case Study

    Care Unlimited, a group of care homes in Surrey, have had Stocksigns Smartsigns installed.

    Surfaces within the homes that change temperature such as water heaters, oven doors, kitchen appliances and machinery have had the signs applied. The signs display the word “HOT” when the surface is above 50°C / 122°F. This sign is particularly useful for Care Homes as children and the elderly are at a higher risk to burn injuries due to sensitive skin.

    Reza Shamtally, Care Unlimited Partner comments, “Smartsign is cost-effective and clever in design. It will no doubt help minimise unnecessary burn injuries within our care homes for employees and clients” 

    smart signcustom made signs

    Memorial Plaques – a guide to creating remembrance plaques and nameplates

    memorial plaque screen printedvitreous enamel memorial plaqueMemorial Plaques – a guide to creating remembrance plaques and nameplates

    Stocksigns can manufacturer a wide range of commemorative and memorial plaques and nameplates including engraved plaques, etched plaques, vitreous enamel, screen printed plaques, cast aluminium, slate and other natural materials. So whether you are looking for a professional nameplate or heritage sign we can guide you through the choice of materials and manufacturing techniques to make your ideal plaques. 

    Here are some factors to think about when choosing your Memorial Plaques:

    • When choosing memorial plaques first work out what text you want to include. The shape of the plaque can depend on the length of the text line. For example, an oval shaped plaque will only accommodate long lines of text in the middle of the sign, where as rectangular or square plaques are suited to where there are long lines of text at the top or bottom. By including braille on your memorial plaques you extend your signs accessibility to the visually impaired.

     

    • The choice of material is also equally important. CastCast memorial signssigns or signs mounted on a wooden back plate are ideal as presentation plaques. Stainless steel gives a modern feel while polished brass is often the preferred choice for professional services nameplates. The engraving and etching process add depth and texture to your sign. The use of a time-honoured natural stone such as slate creates a distinguished looking custom made signsdurable sign.

    •  

      www.stocksigns.co.uk 

      Stocksigns the health and safety signs and custom made signage manufacturer

      Stocksigns for all your signage needs

       

    Beach Safety Signs- Phew what a scorcher!

    Beach Safety – RNLI Beach Safety Signs

    The hottest April on record certainly drew us all to the sea – or so it seemed judging by the traffic jams over the Easter weekend. With this earlier than usual start to the “beach Season” its worth reminding ourselves that the seaside can be a dangerous environment if lack of awareness or respect for the power of water leads to complacency and then possibly onto tragic drama. How can we look after our own beach safety and that of our families, as well as that of others, when we enjoy that Great British institution – a day at the seaside?

    Another iconic institurion, the RNLI, has been at the forefront of a campaign to improve beach safety as part of its overall role as ‘the charity that saves life at sea’. Ever since 7 years agowhen a four year old boy was drowned whilst on a beach in Cornwall, the lack of information through signage was seen by Ryan’s mother as a major contributing factor to this tradgedy. Subsequently the RNLI have produced an extremely comprehensive guide to beach safety, in particular the use of beach safety information signs.

    For safety at the beach, of course, it is not enough just to put up beach safety signs and have an understandable system of warning flags; people who visit the beach have a responsibility to ‘read, mark and inwardly digest’ what the signs and flags mean, as well as keeping an eye out for the safety of in particular theirs and other children.

    When you go to the beach, check whether the facility has been signed up effectively – the signs are on both the RNLI website and the Stocksigns web catalogue (RNLI approved) pages 142 and 143. Here are some examples.

    beach safety signsbeach safety signsbeach safety signs

    If not, why not tackle the operator or the local council about their absence. It may save a life. Above all, be aware and sensible, we know that water can be terifyingly destructive.

    For information on general beach safety signs and their means visit our post water safety signs

    Bike Safety – a simple common sense guide to cycle safety signs.

    cycle safety signs,cycle route signsBike safety – a common sense guide to cycle safety signs

    As the days lengthen and the temperature rises, so does one’s enthusiasm for taking the bicycle out of the shed and setting off down country lanes, along old railway lines or taking the cycle paths or lanes that are now available to make cycling both more enjoyable and above all safer – safe for both cyclists themselves, as well as other users of the public highways.bike safety signs, cycle lane

     Bike safety – bike accessories & cycle routes

    think bike - cycle safety signsObviously we have to make sure our own bicycles themselves are safe, before pedalling off – tyres, chains, bike lights, cycle helmets and brakes all need to be checked. After that we have to look at our own cycling safety particularly on Public roads and especially in the presence of large vehicles. Nowadays you can see special cycle safety signs on the back of lorries warning of the visibility problems that drivers can have if you get too close.cycle warning sign
    Secondly, cyclists should use dedicated lanes or pathways both for their own safety and out of consideration for others. Life can be so much more relaxed and enjoyable with a bit of common courtesy – ‘do as you would be done by’ is a useful mantra. This cuts both ways of course, and motorists have not only to respect specific cycle routes but more generally need to be aware of other road users, as do cyclists in relevant circumstances .bike safety - cyclists dismount
    Sometimes exclusive cycle parking locations are provided. Please use them for the security of your own property at the very least.

    It goes wothout saying the law and Highway Code needs to be obeyed. Don’t cross traffic lights at red, for example, or ride more than two abreast. Above all everybody should use their own common sense.

    Safety is the responsibility of every road user, and this coupled with politeness, can make the bike parking signouting, however short, on self powered two wheels an enjoyable and life-enhancing experience- On your bike!

    For more information on road signs and bike safety signs visit our on line signs shop or call Tel. 01737 77 40 72

    Hazard Signs – Understanding Hazard Safety Signs

     

    hazard signHazard Signs , Warning, Danger, or Caution safety signs

    The category of safety signs generally referred to as “Hazard signs” play an essential role in the management of your safety procedures protecting your staff, visitors and premises. Hazard signs are displayed to advise and forewarn of potential dangers. Hazard signs have a yellow triangle with a black pictogram or symbol on yellow background with a black border. Continue reading

    Emergency Way Guidance using Photoluminescent Material

    Photoluminescent way guidance

    This photo was taken in the stairwell here at Stocksigns illustrating the intensity of the luminosity of Hilume.

    In situations of emergency evacuation, especially when confronted by power failure, a way guidance system using photoluminescent tapes, signs and markers will help to indicate clearly defined escape routes, saving critical time for the evacuation of the building.

    BS 5266-6: 1999, is a Code of Practice for non-electrical low mounted way guidance marking using a photoluminescent system. It recommends how to plan, design, install and maintain the system when used in conjunction with powered emergency lighting. The use of this standard, combines with BS ISO 16069:2004, Graphical symbols-Safety signs – Safety way guidance systems and BS 5499-4: 2000, Code of Practice for escape route signs, gives the answers to most questions that could be asked from those contemplating installing a photoluminescent way guidance system.

    The installation of a photolumiescent way guidance system does not replace the use of powered emergency lighting when this is required, but compliments its existence. For a satisfactory performance, photoluminescent materials require initial activation from a good light source.

    Water Safety Signs

    National Water Safety Signs

    The recently published part II of BS5499. provides a uniform family of water safety signs based on the signs produced by the National Water Safety Committee. These signs should be used at al locations where sport or recreational activities are taking place, to warn the public of possible hazards or dangerous situations and to give specific instructions for their safety.

    Water Safety Signs

    There are three main types of water safety signs you will find when you are around water. Each one has its own meaning, but all of them work to the same system. If you go to the seaside, then there are sometimes special flags to also look out for.

    In addition to the water safety signs, you will also find information signs telling you where the toilets are or where you can get first aid. They will also tell you where the public rescue equipment is held.

    Water safety signs

    This sign means: Beware - Deep Water1. Hazard signs -Signs that warn you of danger, are always:
    • Triangle shaped
    • Yellow background, with black symbols
    • They are placed to help you spot a hazard that is not always obvious

    They mean that you should be aware of something 

                                                   2. Prohibition signs – This sign means: No DivingSigns that mean you should not do something, are always:
    • A red ring shape, with a line running through
    • White background, red line and black symbols or shapes
    • They inform you of things you are not supposed to do

    These signs tell you that it would be dangerous to do something, or go in that place.

    This sign means: Lifejackets must be worn.

    3. Mandatory signs -Signs that mean you should do something, are always:

    • Blue and circle shaped
    • White symbols or shapes
    • They inform you of things you need to do

    These signs tell you that you should do something to be safe.

    Other signs you might see:

    This sign means: Rescue equipment (this way).

    Information signs, are always:

    • White background
    • Black symbols or text

    These signs help you either find something, or get somewhere.

    First Aid safety signsSafe condition signs, are always:Green background

    • White symbols or text

    These signs tell you where important safety items are such as the first aid place, or the emergency telephone.

    A red warning flag.Water safety flags

    At beaches there are flags to tell us when and where it is safe to use the water.

    This red flag means it is unsafe to be in the water.

    Resources:

    The Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents For more information on general water safety

    Fire Extinguisher Identification

    Fire Extinguisher identification signsFire Extinguisher Identification to BS EN3 and BS 7863

    Under BS EN 3 operative from the 1st January 1997, all new certified fire extinguishers used in European Union countries must feature red bodies. In line with familiar UK practice, BS 7863 allows manufacturers to affix coloured identification panels on or above the operating instructions covering no more than 5% of the body surface area and visible through a horizontal arc of 180 degrees when the extinguisher is mounted.

    The new harmonised European standard on fire extinguishers – BS EN3 –  which came into effect in 1st January 1997, provides a single standard for fire extinguishers across Europe. It replaced the old British Standard BS 5423, which has now been withdrawn.

    BS EN3 is the standard now used for the specification, manufacturing and purchase of extinguishers in the UK. An additional standard BS 7863 details the revised colour coding system and supplements BS EN3.

    BS EN3 is not retrospective and pre-existing extinguishers do not need to be replaced with extinguishers to this new standard. However, any replacements as a result of damagefire extinguisher location panel, wear or un-serviceability or new extinguishers will need to meet this new, later standard.While BSEN3 has now been in place for a number of years Understanding the colours and codes should be part of your regular health and safety training and form part of your new staff induction programme. There are a number of resources such as Fire Extinguisher Colour Guide Code Charts and Fire Extinguisher colour code guide pocket guides that can serve as staff information points and training aids. Fire Extinguisher location panels can aid your routine premises maintenance. As well as providing information on the use of the particular fire extinguisher mounted they also give a visual warning as to when the extinguisher has been used and not replaced.

    The New Standard Fire Extinguisher Standard
    The main differences between the old and new standards are:

    • A minimum of 95% of the extinguisher body must be red
    • Zones of colour, indicating the contents of the extinguisher, are permitted
    • The markings on the extinguisher must follow a specified layout
    • Pictograms are used indicating the type of fires that the extinguisher is suitable for
    • A minimum body shell thickness is specified
    • Minimum fire performance ratings for the size of the extinguisher are specified
    • Operating temperatures of some extinguishers are increased
    • Some discharge times are increased

    Although there are many technical changes and the improvements in the new standard, the most noticeable change is to the colour of the extinguisher bodies.

    fire extinguisher identification guide

    Fire Extinguisher Colour Guide Code

    Fire Extinguisher Colours and Codes

    Understanding the colours and codes should be part of your regular health and safety training and form part of your new staff induction programme. There are a number of resources such as Fire Extinguisher Colour Guide Code Charts and Fire Extinguisher colour code guide pocket guides that can serve as staff information points and training aids. In the UK we were used to a system of using the colour of the body of the extinguisher to indicate its contents. However, this system has been peculiarly British with all extinguishers in Europe being coloured completely red.

    Since extinguisher colour is no longer used to identify the type of the extinguisher, it falls to the standard pictograms to illustrate the types of fire that extinguisher can be used on. The pictograms are: Fire Extinguisher Types Pictogram

    Class A fires involving organic solids; e.g. wood, paper
    Class B fires involving flammable liquids
    Class C fires involving flammable gases
    Class F fires involving cooking oil and fat

    A concession was made in this latest standard for a small zone of colour to be available on the body of the extinguisher to further help identify the contents of the extinguisher. A colour zone of up to 5% of the surface area of the extinguisher can be positioned on the top half of the front of the extinguisher body and be visible from 180 degrees. The British Standard BS 7863 outlines the colours that can be used in this way and follows the colour coding that has been used for many years. In addition, there is now a new colour for the Wet Chemical extinguisher (see guide above). The colour codes are:

    Red – Water
    Cream – Foam
    Blue – Powder
    Black – Carbon Dioxide
    Canary Yellow – Wet Chemical

    A further effect of the latest standard is that customised colours (most commonly chromed stainless steel) are no longer allowed; although, as there is no immediate need to change these extinguishers, they (and particularly the stainless extinguishers) may well be in use for some considerable time.

     

    Replacement of Extinguishers
    Even though pre-existing extinguishers do not need to be replaced, the gradual appearance of the new, latest standard extinguishers alongside older types may cause some confusion. The continued presence of other coloured extinguishers in an area may suggest to some users that the red extinguishers will contain water but this might not be the case, with potentially serious consequences.

    Everyone should now what to do in the event of a fire and this includes being able to select the appropriate type of extinguisher to use. To reduce the chances of confusion, mixing new and old standard extinguishers in the same area or building should be avoided.

    Note also that the British Standard on servicing BS5306: Part 4 states that all extinguishers installed in any one building or single occupancy should have the same method of operation and, if intended for the same function, should all be similar in shape, appearance and colour.

    Summary for Fire Extinguisher Identification

    • Ensure that all new extinguishers obtained comply with BS EN3
    • Ensure that everyone is able to identify the different types of fire extinguisher and their respective use through training & Guides
    • Provide information on the colour standards for fire extinguishers
    • Clearly sign extinguishers and their use with fire safety equipment signs
    • Do not mix extinguishers conforming to the old and new standards
    • Do not mix extinguishers which have different operating methods

    Stocksigns has the largest range of fire fighting equipment signs on the market for more information on these and our other safety signs why not order our safety signs catalogue or call our Sales Team on 01737 77 40 72.

    Where to use Electrical Emergency Luminaires

    emergency door lightingElectrical Emergency Luminaires – Joanna Godden

    Emergency lighting is designed to illuminate automatically the emergency escape route (i.e. staircases, landings, passageways etc.) upon failure of the supply to the normal artificial lighting. The emergency lighting must comply with BS 5266: 2005. It is vital that emergency lighting comes on if the normal lighting fails. It needs to be sufficiently bright, illuminated for enough time, and the light sources so positioned that the staff and visitors of a building can be evacuated safely in an emergency

    Siting of Luminaires

    Luminaires should be sited in the following positions:

    • At each exit door
    • At each intersection of corridors
    • At each change of direction
    • Close to each staircase
    • Close to any change in floor level
    • Close to fire equipment and alarm call point locations
    • At locations that adequately illuminate emergency escape and safety signs

    Maintained & Non-maintained Systems.

    Non-maintained systems are used in buildings with a limited occupation time, such as offices and shops, and only operate when the power fails. In general, Maintained systems are required for places of entertainment and licensed premises and can be on all the time from normal mains supply, remaining on when the power fails.

    electrical emergency luminaires

    For more information contact our sales team on Tel 01737 77 40 72 or sales@stocksigns.co.ukelectrical emergency luminaireelectrical emergency luminaire

    Top 10 signage areas to consider for the Disability Discrimination Act

    disabled toilet sign

    Safety signs and Disability Discrimination Act

    On October 1st 2004 the final stage of the goods, facilities and services provisions part 3 of the Disability Discrimination Act came into force. Although the legislation has been in place for some time our need to meet the guidelines is still firmly in place. This article is a reminder of what we need to consider in terms of signs and our obligations to the DDA.

    The aim of this legislation is to achieve equality between the disabled and able-bodied; it introduces a basic duty not to treat disabled people less favourably than others. The new basic duty or obligations apply to anyone providing a paid or unpaid service to the public. As a “service provider” you must ensure that access is available to all disabled people and that entry routes, facilities and all information are clearly defined and indicated by suitable signage. The regulations concern access, mobility and site signage, they apply to all service providers, ranging from large corporations to small businesses (not the owners of the premises).

    Under recent changes to part 2 of the Act, all employers must now ensure that they do not discriminate against disabled people in terms of recruitment and employment conditions. Compliance with the DDA can be achieved effectively by most businesses within a modest budget; however, planning is essential to ensure that the disabled user is not at a disadvantage. The new provisions are a further important step towards ensuring that disabled people have access to services that others take for granted.

    10 Sign areas to consider with the Disability Discrimination Act

     

    You are required to make reasonable adjustments to your premises; the areas to be considered are the signing and marking of:

    1. designating car parking bays
    2. setting down points
    3. routes to and around buildings
    4. building entrances and exits
    5. directions to facilities i.e. lifts, stairs, reception, toilets, restaurants etc.
    6. information on additional services available to the disabled
    7. clear indication of help points
    8. emergency exit routes
    9. emergency disabled refuges
    10. the enhancement of general information signage

    For additional advice on signage and the DDA we would recommend carrying out a site survey for your premises.

    ISO 7010 – An Overview

    ISO 7010 safety signsISO 7010 – An Introduction

    Over the next few months we will see the adoption of a new standard for safety signs as ISO 7010 is soon to become Pr EN 7010. The change will see safety signs in the workplace move away from being an “International standard” (essentially a recommendation on best practice), to a European norm (meaning the contents of the standard must be written into UK and EU law). ISO 7010 has been developed to provide consistency in design across the EU. We will be phasing in the new designs throughout 2011 and you may notice some design changes to the symbols whereas others will look virtually unchanged. Whilst the new symbols will be replacing the old designs, both designs will still meet your safety obligations.

    ISO 7010 – An Overview.

    In the late seventies, as the European Community was coming into being, it was recognised that with a large migratory workforce within the EU countries, there would be a real problem communicating health and safety issues.

    It was decided to create an international standard based on pictograms. This lead to the publishing, in 1984, of the first health and safety standard; ISO 3864-Safety Colours and Safety Signs, which is still current today and is the basis for both ISO 7010 and BS 5499.

    Because ISO 3864 was not grounded in law, it did not become established across the EU. So, in 1992, a European Directive based on ISO 3864 was passed, which made it a legal requirement for member states to write the requirements into their countries health and safety legislation, this was EC Directive 92/58/EEC.
    In the UK this took the form of the “Health & Safety (Signs and Signals) Regulations 1996.

    The Directive was a bit vague regarding the symbols to be used and soon a variety of different symbols had developed across Europe, the “Euro” fire exit symbol being a good example.

    The situation regarding these symbols now needed to be rectified.

    Here in Britain, this lead to the revision of the previous standard and in 2002, BS5499:2002 Graphical Symbols and Signs, was issued.

    The need for correct pictograms across Europe was now evident and so the International Standards Organisation were compelled to update their own standards and so, using BS 5499 as a basis, they split ISO 3864 into two parts:

    ISO 3864:2002 – covering shape and colours, as before.
    ISO 7010:2003 – covering pictograms.

    As previously seen in the Eighties, for these changes to have any impact, it would be necessary to write this standard into law, which is the process we are in the middle of now.

    Making ISO 7010 into an EN, means that the status of the standard will change from being a recommendation of best practice, to a European Norm, requiring that the contents of the Standard are written, without change, into all EU countries laws.

    This means that there will be a legal requirement for the same sign to be used in every country for the same requirement.
    It will mean that a fire exit sign in England will be the same as it would be in France, Spain, Germany or anywhere at all within the EU.

    ISO 7010 – A Brief History – milestone timeline

    Late seventies – large migratory workforce in the EEC
    1978 – BS 5499 – Fire Safety Signs, Notices and Graphic Symbols
    1992 – EC Directive 92/58/EEC
    1996 – “The Health & Safety (Signs and Signals) Regulations
    2002 – BS 5499:2002 – Graphical Symbols and Signs
    2003 – ISO 3864:2002 and ISO 7010:2003ISO 7010, no smoking sign, prohibition safety signs

    our new 2011 catalogue is has been completely updated to include the NEW ISO 7010 safety symbols

    Safety Signs – How to clean your safety signs

    safety signsKeeping Your Safety Signs Clean

    Safety signs are placed around shops and businesses, typically warning staff, customers and passersby that there is a hazard or safety issue. The safety signs over time can become dull and dirty from various elements that accumulate on them, this can obscure the valuable workplace safety message but also can make your premises look unkempt. These signs are often made of a hard rigid plastic, vinyl or aluminium, allowing you to easily clean your safety signs with inexpensive ingredients. For added protection and increased longevity ask our sales team about having your safety signs made with “POF” protective overlay film.

    Things You’ll Need to clean your safety signs:

    • Bucket
      Water
      Mild soap
      Vinegar
      Cleaning rag
      Nylon brush

    Instructions for Cleaning your safety signs

    1. Fill a bucket with about 2 litres warm water and 2 tbsp. of a mild detergent such as washing up liquid or laundry detergent. For a disinfectant quality, add an optional 1/2 cup of white vinegar.

    2. Dip a soft cleaning rag into the cleaner and wipe it over your safety signs.

    3. Very gently swish a nylon scrub brush into the cleaner if needed when heavier residue is present, again wiping over the sign until all grime is removed.

    4. Wipe down the sign again with a clean, damp rag and allow to air dry.

    For more information on safety signs visit our main website www.stocksigns.co.uk/safety-signs

    .

    Safety Signs as Safety Communication Tools

    Construction Safety Signs, Site safetyCommunication with Safety Signs

    Safety signs and symbols are important safety communicating tools, they help to indicate various hazards that present in plant site or workplace. At the same time, they warn workers to always keep watching out for those hazards by giving required information and safety instructions.

    Safety signs and symbols do not only inform the presence of hazards, but also help create workers’ safety awareness. It is very important in reducing accidents in  the workplace more obviously in maufacturing, heavy industry and on construction sites but also important in office based environments too.

    To get the most out of health and safety signs and symbols, you should choose the right ones for each work location on your premises. Each work area needs different workplace health and safety signs and symbols. This is because each work area has different types of hazard. A risk assesment of each activity or designated area will help identify hazards. Appropriate actions for ensuring safety can then be drawn up and selecting the appropriate safety signs can then be selected. Where possible safety signs shown be changed (at least their location) to keep the safety message fresh and to avoid “sign blindness”.

    Safety Signs and Symbols Standards

    Safety signs and symbols consist of messages, words and pictorial symbol with variety of sizes, shapes and colours. All the shapes and colours are standardised. Each shape has different meaning and each colour reflects specific meaning.

    Using standardised health and safety signs and symbols will make them understandable and overcome language barriers and the new ISO 7010 standard is the first step towards a global harmonization of safety symbols. More indepth infomation can be found at Safety Signs, Symbols and Colour Codes – a simple guide

    Safety Signs – Shapes

    The shapes of workplace health and safety signs are triangles, circles and squares or rectangles.

    i. Triangles: indicates caution (potential hazards) or warning (definite hazards), for example toxic gas and electric shock.

    ii. Circles: mandatory or recommended actions and are normally used to depict an action you must do, for example wearing eye goggles and safety hard hats.

    iii. Squares or rectangles: shows information, i.e. general information and emergency information (first aid, fire fighting).

    iv.  A Circle with a 45° diagonal slash across the middle from the upper left to the lower right: points out forbidden or prohibited actions.

    Safety Signs – Colours

    The colours used in workplace safety signs and symbols are red, yellow, blue and green.Fire Safety Signs

    i. Red signs: designates areas for emergency devices like fire fighting equipment, or to emphasise unsafe or forbidden actions.

    ii. Yellow: notifies workers to take caution and be alerted of hazards, reducing necessary risks.

    iii. Blue: shows a particular action or behavior, for example instruction to wear personal protective equipment.

    iv. Green: designates the location of emergency measures or euipment like first aid kits, evacuation routes, fire exits, escape ladders, or assembly point.

    Safety Signs – Pocket Guides

    Simple pocket guide with at a glance guide to the different colours and symbols used in safety signs make excellent reference material for workplace safety training and can be issued as part of new employee induction training.

    School Signs – Building School Identity with Signs

    School Signs – Building School Identity with Signs.

    There are several elements of school signage schemes that can be used to build school identity. These can range from clear branded welcome boards, navigation signs, information signs, down to standard health and safety signs. They all have their part to play in building school identity.

    School Welcome Signs

    The main school entrance signs and welcome boards are your first signage points of contact with staff, children, parents and visitors and are your primary identity builders. If you start with strong images and messages on these boards, these design elements can then be carried throughout the school and grounds on all the remaining signage.

    school signs

    noticeboard, school signs

    Navigational  and Wayfinding School Signs

    Wayfinding school signsYour wayfinding signs should carry the same branding elements e.g. school colours and logos etc as your “Welcome” School signs. Directories and wayfinding sign systems aim to make navigation around unfamiliar grounds and buildings as simple as possible. These signs are often the second point of contact after the “Welcome Boards” that people have with your school and first impressions count. As well as the functionality of the sign, design and aesthetics should be considered. School names and logos should be recognised at a glance and directional instructions should be instantly understood. An efficient way finding system will help new students orientate themselves quickly and alleviate some of the anxiety felt by new pupils. If they can find their way round easily from the start they will have a much more comfortable and relaxedwayfinding school signs start to their time at your school. All these small elements help to build a positive feel to the identity of the school. For more information on creating an efficient wayfinding system see our articles on How to use Signs to Build Company Brand – Part 2 Way Finding Signs  and  Planning Your Wayfinding .

     Information School Signs

    Children’s information signs help to create boundaries and guidelines to keep children safe. By publishing some of the guidelines you advertise your commitment to safety and to children’s personal and social development. Our article on using  school and playground signs as 

    school signs

    teaching aids illustrates how they can be used to promote people skills and relationship building as well as traditional learning. For general information signs and notices use your school colours and keep the font used the same throughout. Even the simplest of information signs benefits from adding your school logo – adding Banners for schoolsauthority to your messages. Use bright 3D Pictorial signs in your premises, these not only soften harsh building environments and add colour but work as teaching aids and can help students with learning difficulties. Use banners not only to advertsise school events in the community but also to celebrate success.

    They can be used to display fundraising targets, results or just good news.

    School Safety Signs

    Safety signs have an obvious purpose – they are used to protect and guide pupils, staff and visitors. There is a legislative obligation to have the correct signage in place. However if you have to have them you may as well get them to work harder and promote your school identity. Add you school logo or name to help create uniformity throughout the school. Use braille sign versions of safety signs to aid your commitment to DDA regulations and children with special needs. Many signage companies will carry our signs site surveys to make sure you are complying with the latest safety legislation giving peace of mind to staff and parents.

    By careful planning your signs can do so much more, whether replacing worn-out signs or going through a refurbishment make sure every sign you purchase works hard in terms of functionality but also helps reflect your school identity.

     For more information on school signs take a look at our “Signs for Schools” guide.

    Mobile phones and driving – protect your fleet

    prohibition health and safety signs, mobile phones and driving

    Mobile Phones & Driving

    A substantial body of research shows that using a hand-held or hands-free mobile phone while driving is a significant distraction, and substantially increases the risk of the driver crashing.

    Safety Signs and Training for Drivers

    Stocksigns offer a range of transport safety signs and driving resources to help protect your staff and fleet. As a working partner of RoSPA we are proud to offer access to RoSPA Fleet Training and consultancy as well as a host of traffic signs.

    For more details on Driver Development courses, Advanced Driver Training and Driver Risk Assessment tools such as “Driver Profiler” please call us on 01737764764 for more information.

    Prohibition Mobile Phone Safety Signs

    The issue of drivers using mobile phones just won’t go away, government and police schemes to raise awareness of the dangers of mobile phones has failed to eradicate the problem. We have a range of safety posters and signs to help you look after your staff and fleet including prohibition signs, traffic signs, information and hazard signs. Visit our signs shop or order a catalogue to learn more.

    Drivers who use a mobile phone, whether hand-held or hands-free:

    • Are much less aware of what’s happening on the road around them.
    • Fail to see road signs.
    • Fail to maintain proper lane position and proper speed.
    • Are more likely to ‘tailgate’ the vehicle in front.
    • React more slowly and take longer to brake.
    • Are more likely to enter unsafe gaps in traffic.
    • Feel more stressed and frustrated.

    They are also four times more likely to crash, injuring or killing themselves and/or other people – RoSPA

     health and safety signs catalogue

     

    Safety Signs, Symbols and Colour Codes – a simple guide

    The use of symbols and graphical images is a simple safety system used to convey safety messages at a glance.

    Colours and symbols appropriately used can provide ever-present information and warnings of hazards which are essential to safety at work, and in some instances may be independent of language

    The Health and Safety (Safety Signs and Signals) Regulations 1996 require employers to provide and maintain safety signs where there is significant risk to health and safety that has not been avoided or controlled by other means (e.g. safe systems of work) provided that the use of a sign can help reduce the risk.  All workplaces and activities where people are employed are covered (with exceptions relating to the transport and supply & marketing of dangerous substances, products and equipment). They also require, where necessary, the use of road traffic signs in workplaces to regulate road traffic. Employers must also ensure that all employees receive appropriate information, instruction and training regarding safety signs.  Although most signs are self-explanatory, some employees (particularly young or new workers) may be unfamiliar with the signs used. Continue reading

    Go Green – photoluminescent fire signs

    Stocksigns ideas to help build your green credentials

    Many companies are committed to recycling and purchasing non-toxic supplies, but they still work in buildings whose materials, electrical systems and waste systems were in place long before being “eco” became the business buzz word of the moment and before the economic benefits of being green were truly understood. Different companies will have different factors to consider when improving their green credentials. For example a solicitors firm will have different concerns than a construction site. But one way Continue reading

    New Air Horn Safety Signs from Stocksigns – ideal for remote areas.

    Stocksigns has developed a new safety sign incorporating a Gas Horn.  Gas horns are ideal fire alarm device’s where a conventional fire alarm system is inappropriate. For example, building sites, concrete plants, quarries, workshops and temporary buildings. They are suitable for internal and external use. The Air horn sign enables you to spot missing safety equipment at a glance. For more information email dharbison@stocksigns.co.uk

    Air horn advert